Book Cover
Kaavad Tradition of Rajasthan
A Portable Pilgrimage
Paper Type: Art Paper (Matt) | Size: 229 x 203mm
All colour; 171 photographs
 Craft

 1495 |  45 |  25

The Kaavad of Rajasthan is a portable shrine with multiple doors that fold into themselves. The Kaavadiya Bhat or the storyteller journeys with this brightly painted wooden box to the homes of his patrons, to recite their genealogies and regale them with the stories of the pantheon of deities painted on the shrine. It is a tradition that binds communities in common memory and mythology. Where did it come from? What is its fate in the world today? Exploring a panel at a time of this curious mnemonic device, the author, of Kaavad Tradition of Rajasthan, Nina Sabnani, leads us on a journey to uncover the myths and mysteries of this unique oral-storytelling tradition.


Nina Sabnani
Nina Sabnani
Author

Nina Sabnani is a storyteller who uses film, illustration and writing to inform her audience. Her doctoral research focused on Rajasthan’s Kaavad storytelling tradition.

B. N. Goswamy
B. N. Goswamy
Foreword
B.N. Goswamy, distinguished art historian, is Professor Emeritus of Art History at the Panjab University, Chandigarh. His work covers a wide range and is regarded, especially in the area of Indian painting, as having influenced much thinking. He has been the recipient of many honors, including the Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship, the Rietberg Award for Outstanding Research in Art History, the JDR III Fellowship, the Mellon Senior Fellowship and, from the President of India, the Padma Shri (1998) and the Padma Bhushan (2008). Apart from the Panjab University, Professor Goswamy has taught, as Visiting Professor, at major universities across the world and has been responsible for significant exhibitions of Indian art at international venues, including Paris, San Francisco, Zurich, New Delhi, San Diego and New York. He is the author of over 25 books on Indian art and culture, including: Pahari Painting; the Family as the Basis of Style (Mumbai, 1968); Painters at the Sikh Court (Wiesbaden,1975); A Place Apart: Paintings from Kutch (with A.L. Dallapiccola; New Delhi,1983); The Essence of Indian Art (San Francisco,1986); Wonders of a Golden Age: Painting at the Courts of the Great Mughals (with E. Fischer; Zurich,1987); Pahari Masters: Court Painters of Northern India (with E. Fischer; Zurich,1992); Indian Costumes in the Calico Museum of Textiles (Ahmedabad,1993); Nainsukh of Guler: A great Indian Painter from a small Hill State (Zurich and New Delhi, 1997); Domains of Wonder: Selected Masterworks of Indian Painting (with C. Smith; San Diego, 2005); And, more recently, the Spirit of Indian Painting: Close Encounters with 101 Great Works (New Delhi and London, 2014, 2016) and Pahari Paintings – the Horst Metzger Collection in the Museum Rietberg (with E. Fischer; Zurich and New Delhi).